Mood and Awareness

It can be scary when a brain injury survivor lacks sufficient awareness of the full effect an injury has had upon his or her life.   It can be all too easy for a survivor in such a circumstance to engage in what could potentially be extremely risky behavior. For instance, if a survivor does not realize that he can no longer walk, he may attempt to get up from his wheelchair anyway to walk to the bathroom. This could lead to a terrible fall. Similarly, a survivor who is not aware that she now suffers from severe memory deficits may turn on a curling iron for her hair and forget to turn it off. This could lead to a fire. When survivors gain in awareness of their situations post-injury, families understandably feel much more at ease as these risky behaviors can only decline.

However, there is one downside to such improved awareness. When a survivor first becomes significantly aware of his or her deficits, he or she often experiences a marked decline in mood. The survivor is suddenly aware of the severity and implications of the injury. It is depressing to realize that life has changed, in some cases irrevocably, and that success over these new challenges can only come after many trials and tribulations. It is important that the loved ones of brain injury survivors understand that this decline in mood is natural and expected. This is the time when a psychologist, counselor or psychotherapist can step in and help the survivor adjust to his or her new situation. With therapy and support, most brain injury survivors will see an improvement in mood after this initial decline due to increased situational awareness.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

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