Monthly Archives: July 2016

Give Yourself Permission

Brain injury survivors and their loved ones often try to approach life after an injury as if it is a fight.  Battle hard, stay strong and never let your enemy see your weaknesses.  But in truth, though there are some similarities in this analogy that are appropriate, life after an injury is not an actual fight.  In fact, by treating it as a real fight survivors and their loved ones can sometimes hurt themselves by not allowing themselves to feel and process certain emotions in a healthy manner.  By not processing emotions, individuals may allow these emotions to fester inside and come out at the wrong time or in the wrong situation.  Not processing emotions can lead to difficulties such as depression, anxiety and relationship stress.  I would like to encourage you to give yourself permission to feel these emotions.

Give yourself permission to get angry at the injury.  It truly is a frustrating and unpleasant experience.

Give yourself permission to cry.  There is no weakness in crying.  This is an appropriate reaction to a painful situation.

Give yourself permission to mourn.  There may be parts of you from the past that will no longer be part of your post-injury future.  It is okay to mourn their passing.

Give yourself permission to laugh.  Laugh at the moments of oddity.  Laughter, in measured amounts, is a reasonable coping technique during times of distress.

Most of all, give yourself permission to experience and value the full range of your emotions.  After all, our emotions are important aspects of who we are as people.  They are a central part of simply being human.  So please give yourself permission to be the complete person that you are, despite your injury.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

 

 

 

Doing It Best

Jahvid Best appeared to be on the road to football stardom.  Drafted in the first round by the Detroit Lions, Best possessed blazing speed that was the envy of other running backs.  Unfortunately, his professional football career met a premature end during it’s second year due to the effects of concussions.  Best put forth great effort to get back into the NFL but ultimately doctors ruled against his return.  For many people, this would be the end of the story.  For Jahvid Best though it was the start of something new.

One of the key tasks that brain injury survivors must navigate is assessing their retained abilities so as to identify what they can still do best in spite of their injuries.  Best understood that though his body was not ready to be tackled by 300 lb linemen, he still had his speed.  Best worked tirelessly at his skills on the track.  The hard word paid off.  Best qualified for the 2016 Olympics in Rio, where he will be representing the island nation of St. Lucia.  Best demonstrated how to thrive and succeed in spite of an injury!  Though he was not a TLC patient, we certainly think he is a true hero for the brain injury community.  Identifying a survivor’s skills and choosing activities that match those skills is a key part of the rehabilitation process.  For more reading on Jahvid Best’s journey, click on the link below:

 

http://olympics.nbcsports.com/2016/07/16/jahvid-best-olympics-detroit-lions-nfl-football-track-and-field-st-lucia/

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/