Tag Archives: acquired brain injury

Emilia Clarke is a Survivor!

On Game of Thrones, Emilia Clarke’s character Daenerys Targaryen is tough as nails and always up for a battle. But perhaps Clarke’s toughest personal battle was when she had brain aneurysms, which included multiple surgeries to save her life. Click the link below to read her personal account of her brain aneurysm experience, including surgery and aphasia:

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/personal-history/emilia-clarke-a-battle-for-my-life-brain-aneurysm-surgery-game-of-thrones

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

Advertisements

Bret Hart is a Survivor!

Bret “The Hitman” Hart is a wrestling legend.  For years he traveled the globe as one of the biggest stars in the world of wrestling.  But even a tremendous athlete like Hart can have a stroke.  Hart had that stroke in 2001.  He spent three months in a wheelchair and countless hours in rehabilitation.  His hard work paid off in an excellent recovery.  Today he represents the March of Dimes Canada’s Stroke Recovery Program, inspiring other stroke survivors!  Click on the link below to watch a video of Bret Hart speaking about his stroke experience:

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

Using the Open Chair Technique

Survivors with brain injuries push themselves to get better.  Staff members at TLC see this every day.  Survivors push themselves to walk better.  They push themselves to speak better.  They push themselves to improve their memory.  They push themselves in every aspect of the rehabilitation experience, but recovery from a serious brain injury can be quite slow.  It is almost always slower than the survivor would prefer it to be.  Unfortunately, this leads some survivors to speak poorly about themselves.  They say things such as “I am a failure because I am not 100% improved” or “I should be much better than I am now.  I am failing at therapy”.  This negative self-talk can lead to emotional difficulties such as stress, low mood and sometimes even to depression.

If looked at objectively, this negative self-talk is often due to unrealistic expectations that the survivors have regarding their recoveries.  The survivors may believe that the amount of time necessary to recover is in excess to that which they expected, even when the medical research shows that they are progressing at a normal rate.  By expecting faster or better results than are humanly possible, survivors can cause themselves unnecessary frustration.

Interestingly, these same survivors who hold unrealistic expectations of themselves generally do not hold these same expectations of others.  They are often more logical and understanding of other survivors than they are of themselves.  It is common at TLC for the same patients who have unrealistic personal expectations to support realistic expectations in other patients.  They will make supportive statements to other patients such as “Don’t worry and take it slow.  You will get better over time.  You are running a marathon not a sprint.”  When the patients with unrealistic expectations are asked if they believe the advice they are giving to others, they almost always answer in the affirmative.  They understand that the brain injury recovery process is a slow one which requires lots of work.  They understand it is a long-term process.  But they decide for whatever reason that their personal recoveries should take less time than those of others, holding themselves up to unfair (often impossible) standards.
One way to manage this negative self-talk is by using the “open chair” technique.  How this technique works is that patients are asked to imagine they are sitting next to themselves and that the person occupying their seat is someone else with the very same issues and deficits that they have.  The patients are then asked to give this “other person” honest feedback about how the “other person” is doing.  Often, patients find that this leads them to soften their tones and to make more supportive personal statements regarding their own progress.  Similarly to when they are actually talking to other patients, when they address themselves as that “other person”  patients demonstrate more realistic expectations and are less likely to attack themselves.  The “open chair” technique often helps patients treat themselves not only better, but also more fairly and honestly.  By being more fair and honest to themselves, survivors tend to have an improved mood.  And the better the mood that survivors can maintain, the easier it is to navigate the rehabilitation process.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center!  Visit us at: tlcrehab.org

Practice Makes Proficient

Neurorehabilitation from a brain injury involves learning and re-learning a long list of common activities.  Patients spend hours honing skills such as naming well-known items, transferring to and from a wheelchair and using adaptive equipment.  Therapy sessions often consist of countless repetitions of the same action, drilling these essential skills over and over (and over).  Further, therapists will usually send patients home with discharge plans outlining continued practicing of these same skills at home.  Sometimes, patients will wonder why they have to practice these activities to such a degree.  After all, if they demonstrated the skill once (or more likely a multitude of times throughout inpatient therapy) doesn’t that serve as proof positive that they now possess said skill?  Why is this repeated practice necessary?

In reality, to truly become proficient at any skill a great deal of of practice is necessary.  Just because a patient has succeeded at demonstrating a skill on one occasion does not mean that he or she will succeed in the future.  This is true for any life activity or field of endeavor.  For instance, imagine hearing the following overhead announcement while taxiing an airport runway prior to takeoff:  “Ladies and gentleman, welcome aboard flight 683 to Phoenix.  My name is Captain Mike and I will be your pilot today.  I have successfully flown a plane once.  I anticipate a smooth flight today.”  After hearing this announcement, most passengers would probably scream for the exits immediately.  Who would trust a pilot to fly a plane with a history of only one successful attempt?  We instinctively recognize that lots of practice is necessary to trust that a person can reliably and competently complete a given task.  This holds just as true for therapy as it does for the for flying of a plane.  Repeated practice, both in therapy and at home, is necessary for a patient to hone the skills and competencies necessary to successfully accomplish rehabilitation goals.  It is only through practice that patients can become proficient.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center!  Visit us at: tlcrehab.org

TLC on TV!

TLC was on TV!  The TLC facilities in Galveston and Lubbock both recently acquired  innovative new robotic arm devices from Bionik Laboratories.  Our partnership with Bionik Laboratories will allow TLC patients to make use of this cutting edge technology in efforts to improve rehabilitation outcomes.  This new technology is so innovative that Fox 26 in Houston came to film a segment at TLC Galveston on the robotic arm and its potential.  Click the link below to see TLC on TV!

http://www.fox26houston.com/news/new-robotic-arm-therapy-being-used-to-help-stroke-patients-recover

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

Dylan O’Brien is a Survivor

Brain injury does not discriminate.  Even those most famous of Hollywood stars are not immune to being injured.  Maze Runner star Dylan O’Brien suffered a brain injury due to an accident while filming the third Maze Runner film.  He needed many months to recover from his injury before he could return to filming.  The most difficult part for Dylan was the emotional aspect of recovery.  The article below is an interesting read in which Dylan opens up about his experiences surrounding the accident.

http://www.vulture.com/2017/09/dylan-obrien-is-back-from-the-brink.html

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

Different Parts, Different Speeds

Brain injury survivors and their families often ask doctors and therapists about how long it will take for brain injuries to heal.  This would seem like a simple and straightforward question, but the answer to this question is actually quite complex.  One of the chief factors that makes any such answer so complex is that different parts of the brain may heal at different speeds.

We often talk about the brain as if it were one unitary body part, but in truth it is made up of many interconnected parts.  For instance, there are distinct left and right sides of the brain that are connected by a set of neurons known as the corpus callosum.  Each side of the brain can be split into many different component parts.  These parts function interdependently, but each part has its own unique purpose.

When a survivor received a brain injury, different areas of the brain may have been damaged at different levels of severity.  Which parts suffered damage at what levels of severity will differ from person to person and from injury to injury.   With so many parts of the brain being impacted differently by an injury, it is very common that a brain injury survivor will see improvements in some areas faster than in others.  For instance, if the part of the brain responsible for speech comprehension was less injured than the speech production part of the brain, that survivor will likely gain back the ability to understand verbal communication well before ability to convey information through speech returns.  If the part of the brain governing leg movement was less injured than the part of the brain controlling the arms, then that person is likely to see a return of the ability to walk through a doorway prior to being able to once again turn a door knob to open that door.  Ultimately, having different skills return at different rates of speed should be understood as a normal and expected part of the brain injury recovery process.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

What Language Do You Speak?

 

There is an interesting phenomenon often observed in brain injury survivors who were bilingual to the extent of fluency prior to their injuries.  In these survivors who have post-injury language deficits the first (native) languages tend to return more quickly and fully than do their second languages.  This is true even in survivors who were fully fluent in a second language and used that second language extensively in their everyday lives.  As TLC is located in Texas, our staff tends to observe this phenomenon most often in Spanish-English bilingual patients.  Many of these patients now contending with language difficulties who learned English later in life find it far easier to name objects or follow directions when Spanish is used, while prior to their injuries they would have been comfortable using either language.

This return of the first language sooner than a second language can have a number of practical consequences.  Many survivors understandably become frustrated at an inability to speak that second language with the same skill once demonstrated.  Being bilingual is often a point of pride and may have previously allowed the survivor to excel in activities (such as import-export business transactions) that the average person could not.  This sudden significant skill gap may even prevent these survivors from returning to jobs in which a second language was utilized as a vital portion of everyday business life.  Moreover, if the survivor was previously the primary translator for the family this may cause difficulties in the family’s ability to interact with the outside world.  For example, the survivor may have previously served as point person to get information from school regarding a child’s performance as that survivor could easily speak to school officials (and the rest of the family may struggle with casual exchanges in English).  If the survivor is now unable to converse fluently in English, the family may now face significant problems interacting with the school.

There are also practical therapy concerns when a survivor struggles with a second language if that second language is the primary language used in the larger community.  In America, English is obviously the dominant language.  As such, most pre-therapy evaluations are conducted in English.  There are a limited number of health care professionals who are comfortable conducting evaluations in another language.  However, if a survivor’s first language is not English and that survivor is significantly stronger in his or her first language, that first language will need to be the language used in evaluations so as to get the most accurate measurements of the survivor’s skills.  The same is true in therapy.  If a survivor understands therapy directions significantly better in a first language, then therapy should be conducted in the survivor’s first language.    Additionally, therapists should always inquire as to which language is used in the home.  If the survivor’s first language is different than the language used at home (seen when someone who speaks both Spanish and English marries a spouse who only speaks English), then that second language will need extra focus or alternative methods of communication (e.g. pictures or hand signals) may need to be introduced.  At TLC, we have a number of Spanish-English bilingual staff and have a contract with a translation service if other help is needed.  Overall, rehabilitation professionals must be aware of survivors’ language skills and adjust evaluations and therapy accordingly.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

Joe Biden is a Survivor

As Vice President of the United States under Barack Obama, Joe Biden served 8 years as one of the most important politicians in America.  Prior to holding the Vice Presidency, Biden served several terms as a senator representing the State of Delaware.  It was during his time as a senator that he required surgery for not one, but two brain aneurysms.  The first aneurysm had ruptured, putting him in a life or death situation.  Doctors saved his life and the recovery from his brain surgeries is simply astonishing.  His ability to succeed at the highest levels of government after these aneurysms is truly inspirational.  Below are a few news articles documenting his surgeries:

http://articles.latimes.com/1988-02-14/news/mn-42679_1_biden-aide

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/05/04/us/biden-resting-after-surgery-for-second-brain-aneurysm.html

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

A Little Note Goes A Long Way

As Thanksgiving approaches, many brain injury survivors are preparing for large get-togethers with family and friends.  Many of these family and friends have not recently seen the survivors in their lives and can understandably be extremely excited to be reunited.  However, there are often a great many changes that survivors have weathered which directly impact their experiences of Thanksgiving with these family and friends.  Close family members may be aware of these changes but extended family and friends may not be.  Email or similar communications can help spread necessary awareness to help ensure successful holiday celebrations.

These communications can be sent by the survivors or by close family members prior to any get-together. The goal is for individuals who are not fully informed of the survivors’ deficits to be given relevant information in order to help holiday celebrations run smoothly.  For instance, if alcohol is typically served at a Thanksgiving meal, friends and family need to know if the survivor is prohibited by a doctor from drinking.  If the survivor becomes agitated when there are too many people surrounding him or her, family and friends need to know to approach the survivor one at a time.  If the survivor can only tolerate food of a certain consistency, family and friends need to know which foods can or cannot be served the survivor.  These are just a few examples of useful information that could be included in a message sent to help avoid problems during a survivor’s Thanksgiving celebration.  Remember, a little note can go a long way toward success!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/