Tag Archives: child

Return to Play is Important But Return to Learn is Vital

With a rise in awareness in the world of sports regarding the strikingly prevalent danger of brain injury and its deleterious effects, there has been a corresponding increase in the development of various concussion protocols for returning to active participation in sports following an injury.  These protocols are now the norm in the major sports leagues such as the NFL, NHL, MLB and NBA.  These “Return to Play” protocols are important for ensuring that athletes do not suffer a second concussion that can compound the damage of a not yet fully healed first one, causing an even more serious injury.  Schools around the country are following suit, pushing for more training on concussions.  In many school districts, concussion training for school athletic trainers and/or coaches is mandatory.  There is also a considerable amount of discussion in the media about return to play policies at the school-age level.  Just as professional athletes do, student athletes need to avoid the effects of compounding brain injuries.  However, there is a subject that seems to be garnering less public conversation but is even more important than when a student may be “ready to play”.  There is far too little discussion about an immensely more important topic, namely when a student is “ready to learn”.

School-age youth universally have one primary “job” in their lives, and that is to perform at their best in school classes.  Though sports are enjoyable and often quite meaningful to students, only a tiny few will go on to earn a sports scholarship to college and just a small fraction of those will ever play professional sports.  And even of this small fraction, only a handful will play more than a few years in professional sports.  Sports are not likely to be any particular student’s full time future job.  However, almost every single student’s future is tied in some way to his or her ability to learn information in a school setting. Most every job, and adult life in general, will require extensive dependence upon skills learned in the classroom such as writing and math.

School is similar to an adult’s full-time job as it encompasses the majority of daytime activities and requires a significant expenditure of cognitive energies on a daily basis to ensure performance at optimal levels.  Pushing a child back to school too quickly post-injury can engender an inability to learn effectively which can lead to a downward spiral of emotional distress and academic failure.  Schools need to work with parents and health professionals in order to create a plan for return to school after a brain injury, whether that injury be suffered on the playing field, in a car accident or by any other means.  Not every child will be able to return quickly or to a full load of classes.  Adjustments may be necessary to the schedule, format or setting of classes and school material.  The child may require special assistance from aids, tutors and note-takers.  The child may also benefit from breaks in the day to when he or she has crossed a threshold of cognitive overload.  If injuries are particularly serious and long-lasting, a Section 504 plan may be necessary.  The Brain Injury Association of Vermont has a sample return to learn protocol that can help guide parents, educators and health professionals as to when a child would likely be ready to healthily engage in different school tasks.

 

http://biavt.org/concussion-kit-documents/Section%207%20-%20RTL%20Protocol-pub%20final_5-9-13.pdf

http://biavt.org/concussion-kit-documents/Section%207%20-%20RTL%20Protocol-pub%20final_5-9-13.pdf

A healthy return to play protocol following a brain injury is important, but we need to remember that a child ultimately does not need to play a sport.  However, every child most assuredly does need to learn in school. So let’s increase the discussion on “ready to learn” plans and needs!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/

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The Role of Support Groups

Going through life with a brain injury can be a remarkably difficult experience for a brain injury survivor.  Life has changed, often in many dramatic ways.  Sometimes utilizing the most basic of skills, such as using the restroom or remembering to turn off an oven, can present the most complex of challenges.  Life is often just as hard (and in some aspects can be even harder) for the survivor’s family.  Everything has changed for them, too.  Family members often find that new roles are now required of them and that new stressors now confront them at every turn.  A wife may now find herself serving as her husband’s primary caregiver.  A brother may now necessarily be conscripted as his sibling’s chauffeur to constant doctor’s appointments.  On top of all this, there is so much to learn in a field with which both survivors and family members almost always have little to no previous familiarity.  This can make for an incredibly lonely experience.  Survivors and family members may ask themselves, “Is there anyone else in the world who knows what this feels like?”  While the brain injury survivor is a patient in an inpatient rehabilitation program (a very common experience in post-injury life), the survivor can often rely upon the camaraderie of fellow patients.  Family members may become friendly with the family members of other survivors and chat on a regular basis.  Both survivors and their families will have regular contact with staff who are able to provide support and knowledge.  However once the survivor discharges from that inpatient facility, he or she suddenly has little to no contact with other brain injury survivors.  Families lose contact with each other and no longer have available as an option just popping in to a therapist’s office for a quick question.  This is when the brain injury experience can be its most lonely.

 
Support groups can help fill this gap.  Support groups are groups of individuals with similar experiences that meet on a regular basis to discuss those experiences.  Individuals may offer suggestions and advice or just provide a shoulder to lean on.  Support groups exist for a wide selection of health-related issues ranging from living with cancer and diabetes to coping with grief, struggling with substance abuse, and of course, rebuilding one’s life in the aftermath of a brain injury.

 
There are two primary types of support groups that are most relevant to brain injury survivors, namely stroke support groups and brain injury support groups.  Stroke groups tend to be more common than brain injury support groups, though in most larger population areas one will be able to find a brain injury support group in addition to stroke support groups.  Among stroke support groups, there is a small subset that are specific to aneurysms (though survivors of aneurysms and their families are of course welcomed in a general stroke support group).  Support groups are often run out of hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, community centers and houses of worship.  If a group’s meetings take place in a hospital, usually the survivor does not have to be a patient (past or present) of that particular hospital in order to attend.  In addition to the aforementioned support groups, there are support groups designed to address certain specific symptoms of brain injuries.  For example, there are aphasia support groups, apraxia support groups and memory support groups.

 
Each support group tends to have its own individual program and essential dynamic.  Some provide more educational content while others tend to offer more of an emotional/social support program.  Some are survivor oriented, others family oriented and still others are oriented to both survivors and their families.  If you do not feel suitably comfortable at one group, you can always attend another group.  Also, there are available some online support groups necessarily better suited to those who have difficulty leaving their homes.  Some survivors and families will even create their own groups when confronted by a lack of groups tailored to their specific needs in their vicinity.

 
Below are a few links that may aid in finding a support group:

 

For brain injury support groups, click on your state affiliate of the Brain Injury Association of America and scroll to the Support Groups section:

http://www.biausa.org/state-affiliates.htm

Stroke support groups:

http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/strokegroup/public/zipFinder.jsp

http://www.stroke.org/stroke-resources/stroke-support-groups

In addition, the American Stroke Association has a family support phone program called the Stroke Family Warmline.  The Warmline phone number is 1-888-478-7653.

Aneurysm support groups:

http://www.bafound.org/support

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org