Tag Archives: hydrocephalus

The Rehabilitation Partnership

One of the most basic truths of successful rehabilitation is that it involves a partnership between the patient and therapists/doctors.  It is important to understand what this partnership entails, namely that without both parties’ investments in the process the patient will only see limited improvements.  This also means that each side has a responsibility to the other side to ensure success.  The job of rehabilitation is a shared job between the patient and rehabilitation professionals.

There are a number of implications to this basic truth of the rehabilitation partnership.  A therapist/doctor cannot make a patient improve.  A therapist/doctor can only work with a patient to help the patient improve.  Keeping this in mind should dissuade rehabilitation professionals from imagining themselves to be like Superman, swooping in to save the patient from the patient’s brain injury.  Brain injury rehabilitation simply does not function like a comic book story.  This realization should also empower the patient with the knowledge that his or her thoughts, feedback and effort are a vital part of rehabilitation (without which success cannot be fully achieved). Professionals need the patient’s thoughts and feedback to best plan and implement therapy.  Every patient is different, so a method that helps one patient may hinder or even harm another.  There is no way for a professional to know this without feedback.  This should also dissuade patients from being too passive when engaging the therapy process.  Rehabilitation professionals cannot help a patient improve if the patient will not try to help him or herself.   They cannot do the work for the patient.

When this partnership between patient, therapists and doctors truly comes together, everyone becomes a vital member of the rehabilitation team.  However, it is important to remember who needs be recognized as “team captain.”  The patient is the “team captain” in the sense that the process is ultimately focused on the patient.  The patient needs to share with the team any and all goals, expectations and dreams.  When the entire team has this information (which has to be updated on a regular basis), the team can best determine the direction therapy needs to take.  For instance, if a patient was formerly a chef and dreams of returning to that former occupation, a great deal of therapy will be focused on activities in the kitchen.  If the patient never went in the kitchen outside of opening the refrigerator door, then therapy will clearly be focused on other activities.

A successful partnership will generally allow the patient and rehabilitation professionals to have a mutual understanding and appreciation of one another.  It will also foster openness, honesty and trust between the patient and the rehabilitation professionals.
Remember, teamwork makes the dream work!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

Using Unique Characteristics to Help Memory

Following a brain injury many survivors face great struggles in the realm of memory.  This can be especially embarrassing when a brain injury survivor has difficulty remembering the name of a person with whom he or she is already well acquainted.  Utilizing techniques that make use of unique characteristics can make it far easier for survivors to remember important names in their lives.

Each person possesses many different characteristics.  These can include height, weight, eye color, tone of voice, expressed clothing preferences, etc.  Trying to remember a person’s name while matching it with all these disparate features can be a daunting task.  When meeting someone for the first time, it is often easier to find the one unique characteristic of the person that stands out most and pair that with the person’s name (e.g. “Paul is the tall guy” or “Susie has a rainbow tattoo on her neck”).  In this way the survivor only has to remember one characteristic in order to recall a person’s name rather than contend with the confusion that would accompany recalling many characteristics.  Unique characteristics can include aspects of physical appearance, dress, voice and behavior.  Let’s give a few examples in each category, using celebrities as examples, to demonstrate how one might execute this technique.

Physical appearance can include height, hair, size/shape of facial features, scars and tattoos.  For instance, former NBA player Shaquille O’Neal has brown eyes, a shaved head and a bright smile.  None of these features necessarily make him stand out.  However, if you were to meet him on the street and were picking one unique characteristic to match with his name, you would likely pick that he is over seven feet tall.  The pairing between height and name would clearly provide a more memorable association than anything involving those other  mentioned characteristics, and would make it far easier to recall Shaq’s name at a later time.  Similarly, comedian Carrot Top is of medium height with fair skin.  Again, these common features would not be useful to pair with his name as an aid to memory.  However, his striking red hair is quite unique and by pairing this unique characteristic with Carrot Top’s name, a survivor would be more likely to later recall his name.

Some people dress in a manner that is simply different from everyone else.  These differences in dress can also be paired with a person’s name in order to make it easier to recall that name.  Michael Jackson was known for wearing one white glove.  No one else was known for effecting that particular fashion choice.  If a survivor would have met Michael and wanted to remember his name, he or she could have paired Michael’s name with the one white glove.  Another example of this can be found in former United States Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.  Albright always wore pins on the upper left shoulders of her jackets.  A survivor could pair the pin with her name in order to better recall her name, rather than attempt to utilize any number of additional characteristics she possesses.

Just like a unique physical characteristic or a unique manner of dress, a unique voice can be paired with a person’s name to help remember him or her.  A voice might be recognized as unique due to a distinct tone, a particular accent or use of a singular delivery.  Actor James Earl Jones has a baritone voice which makes him a favorite choice for voice-over work in commercials and the like.  By pairing his deep voice with his name, a survivor could more easily identify him by name at a future meeting.  Similarly, actress Fran Drescher has an unmistakable New York accent which she played up in the television show “The Nanny.”  If a survivor was to meet her for the first time, the survivor could pair her accent with her name to help remember her at a later time rather than trying to remember any other likely more common of her features.

Sometimes, a new acquaintance may demonstrate a behavior that is so different from that of others that it can be used as one of these unique characteristics to aid in memory.  This can sometimes prove a little harder to use for memory unless the person in question demonstrates the identified behavior all of the time.  For instance, Elvis Presley often had a lip twitch/snarl when speaking which other people do not have.   In a different vein, John Wayne walked with his legs spread in a wide gait.  Both a constant lip twitch/snarl and idiosyncratic pattern of walking can be paired to names to more easily remember a person at a later time.

Survivors should not worry about whether the characteristic being used is complimentary to the other person.  If pairing the name “Julie” with “giant nose” helps the survivor remember Julie later, then this is fine.  There is no need to share with the other person that this technique is being used to aid memory.  The key is whether the characteristic is so memorable to the survivor that pairing the characteristic with the name will make it easier for the survivor to remember.  Further, this technique does not prevent the survivor from adding other, more mundane characteristics to his or her memory of the other person.  This technique is primarily designed for when a survivor is first trying to learn the other person’s name.

Hopefully this method will help survivors remember others’ names and be spared the embarrassment of forgetting!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

Who Will Be There When I Am Gone?

Fields related to the treatment of brain injury have improved by leaps and bounds over the last twenty to thirty years.  People who have suffered severe traumatic brain injuries are today surviving from injuries that would have once been fatal.  Health care professionals are able to manage associated medical issues and injury deficits left in the wake of traumatic brain injury better than ever before.  This has led to brain injury survivors with serious impairments being able to live longer than could have been imagined just a short time ago.  This also then means that many of these survivors will have need for others to serve as caregivers for them many years into the future (in some cases even for decades).  These caregivers may be called upon not only to help with day-to-day activities but also may be legally responsible for making medical, legal and financial decisions.  This brings us to an important question for those caregivers to consider. If something decisively unfortunate were to befall such a caregiver, have contingency plans been made to ensure that those care and legal responsibilities would continue to be sufficiently addressed?  For example, let’s say that a forty year-old man survives an aneurysm which leaves him unable to make his own decisions and subsequently his sixty-five year-old mother takes over these responsibilities for him.  A man that young in reasonably good health could fairly be expected to live at least another twenty years under such a circumstance, which would then put his mother at eighty-five.  Can anyone guarantee that his then eighty-five year old mother would continue to have the ability to make such decisions for him?  What happens if she faces a health issue such as Alzheimer’s or cancer that would effectively dismantle her ability to make his decisions for him?  Can anyone even guarantee that she will survive all the way to eighty-five?  Clearly, a plan needs to be put in place to designate a replacement to step into the mother’s critical role in this man’s life should she suffer incapacitation or pass away.

Putting together such a plan is no simple task and in many cases families will need to consult an attorney in order to formulate a coherent, legally binding plan.  These plans will generally involve issues such as daily care, financial management and legal responsibilities.  Questions have to be answered such as where the survivor will live and who will monitor disability or like payments should a current caregiver be unable to continue in his or her role.  Also, plans may need to be updated over time to reflect changes.  Using the earlier example, let’s say that in the mother’s will she appoints the survivor’s uncle to take over the legal responsibilities in her son’s life after she’s gone.  If this uncle’s wife developed a serious illness that suddenly demanded all his time and energy, the mother would likely want to update her will and appoint a new person to be responsible in case she became incapacitated or passed away.  Sometimes multiple people are listed in the plan (often in descending order), identifying a line of succession regarding those responsible for seeing to the survivor’s well-being.  This even further bolsters guarantee of a survivor’s continued security.  Sometimes roles are also divided among different individuals.  As example, one person may be responsible for daily physical care while a different person might be assigned ultimate authority over medical decisions.  No matter what plan is put in place (for this or for any other issue), the brain injury survivor should take part in the planning to the best of his or her abilities.

Planning for the future is a serious issue and should be started as early as possible.  Most survivors’ brain injuries make entrance into life suddenly and without warning, and caregivers can just as abruptly have their own issues present that prevent them from maintaining their caregiver roles.  For those that do not have the financial means to hire an attorney to develop a plan, there are legal aid offices throughout the United States that provide free legal services.  Follow the link below to search for a legal aid office in the United States.

 

http://www.lsc.gov/what-legal-aid/find-legal-aid

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/