Tag Archives: verbal

What Language Do You Speak?

 

There is an interesting phenomenon often observed in brain injury survivors who were bilingual to the extent of fluency prior to their injuries.  In these survivors who have post-injury language deficits the first (native) languages tend to return more quickly and fully than do their second languages.  This is true even in survivors who were fully fluent in a second language and used that second language extensively in their everyday lives.  As TLC is located in Texas, our staff tends to observe this phenomenon most often in Spanish-English bilingual patients.  Many of these patients now contending with language difficulties who learned English later in life find it far easier to name objects or follow directions when Spanish is used, while prior to their injuries they would have been comfortable using either language.

This return of the first language sooner than a second language can have a number of practical consequences.  Many survivors understandably become frustrated at an inability to speak that second language with the same skill once demonstrated.  Being bilingual is often a point of pride and may have previously allowed the survivor to excel in activities (such as import-export business transactions) that the average person could not.  This sudden significant skill gap may even prevent these survivors from returning to jobs in which a second language was utilized as a vital portion of everyday business life.  Moreover, if the survivor was previously the primary translator for the family this may cause difficulties in the family’s ability to interact with the outside world.  For example, the survivor may have previously served as point person to get information from school regarding a child’s performance as that survivor could easily speak to school officials (and the rest of the family may struggle with casual exchanges in English).  If the survivor is now unable to converse fluently in English, the family may now face significant problems interacting with the school.

There are also practical therapy concerns when a survivor struggles with a second language if that second language is the primary language used in the larger community.  In America, English is obviously the dominant language.  As such, most pre-therapy evaluations are conducted in English.  There are a limited number of health care professionals who are comfortable conducting evaluations in another language.  However, if a survivor’s first language is not English and that survivor is significantly stronger in his or her first language, that first language will need to be the language used in evaluations so as to get the most accurate measurements of the survivor’s skills.  The same is true in therapy.  If a survivor understands therapy directions significantly better in a first language, then therapy should be conducted in the survivor’s first language.    Additionally, therapists should always inquire as to which language is used in the home.  If the survivor’s first language is different than the language used at home (seen when someone who speaks both Spanish and English marries a spouse who only speaks English), then that second language will need extra focus or alternative methods of communication (e.g. pictures or hand signals) may need to be introduced.  At TLC, we have a number of Spanish-English bilingual staff and have a contract with a translation service if other help is needed.  Overall, rehabilitation professionals must be aware of survivors’ language skills and adjust evaluations and therapy accordingly.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

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Using Stories To Aid In List Memory

The human brain is fascinating for so many reasons.  One of these reasons can be seen in the expression of its preference for different styles of memory.  The brain generally has a preference for remembering stories as opposed to random lists of information, even though there are many more words in a story to remember than there are in a list.  It can be demonstrated though that this preference for stories can in fact be used to help bolster the memory for lists of items.

Individuals generally encounter lists of items in areas of daily life related to shopping, school, work, and other like activities.  You may have a list of items that you need to buy at a supermarket.  Your boss may ask you to pick up a list of items from the stockroom to place on shelves.  A teacher may ask you to bring in certain items for a class project.  Although it is of course advisable to write down or record in some manner any such list of items, you may not always have a pen and paper or other recording device available.  If you take such a list of items and turn it into a brief story though, you might be surprised by how much easier it becomes to remember.

Let’s say you have three items to remember to buy at the store: milk, cookies and napkins.  You can use to your advantage the brain’s natural preference for having these items organized as components of a story over simply having them listed one after the other.  It takes little effort to come up with a brief, one-line story that uses these words.  For example, the story in this instance could be “I like to dip my cookies and milk and then wipe my mouth with napkins.”  Most people will find it easier to remember this short story than to remember those same three words in list form.  A similar scenario could be encountered working at a large store like Wal-Mart or Target.  Your  boss may ask you to bring out light bulbs, toilet paper and paper cups.  This is a pretty random list of items which may be difficult to remember in its current form.  Turning this list into a short story may be beneficial.  For instance, the story here could be “There is no light bulb in the bathroom so he tripped over the toilet paper and knocked over the paper cups.”  Again, by putting the list of words into a brief story, the brain will find it easier to remember the information.

There are a few handy pointers to keep in mind when turning a list of items into a story.  First, the story should be relatively brief.  If you are trying to remember three or four words, the story should not be much longer than a single complex sentence.  Five or six items may require a story to be two to three lines long.  A story cannot be so long that it becomes itself difficult to remember.  The story should also create a visual image in your mind.  If you can “see” the story in your mind, then chances are that you’ve succeeded in creating a story useful in achieving the objective of bolstering memory in this way.  Using one of the previous examples, you may be able to imagine someone in a dark room tripping over toilet paper and knocking over cups sitting by the sink.  If you can see this happening in your mind, then the story worked for you.  It is very important that the story be one that is functional for you.  You should not concern yourself about whether others would like your story or find your story odd.  Too often, brain injury survivors using this method will self-censor their stories because they feel that others might not like those stories as they initially occur to the survivors.  These stories exist only to aid our memories.  The opinions others might hold of them therefore are not truly relevant.

This method of improving memory takes practice but once you get comfortable with the method, it can be very useful!  Please leave me a comment below with any questions, thoughts or ideas!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

Visual and Verbal Memory

Most information that we try to remember usually comes through only two of our five senses, vision and hearing.  Interestingly, the memories we make for this information is generally stored in two separate parts of our brain.  We tend to store verbal memories from the information that we heard in the left side of the brain.  We tend to store visual memories from the information that we saw in the right side of the brain.  One way that we can help our memory is by using both sides of our brain during memory tasks.

We can help our verbal memory by taking the information that we hear and creating pictures in our mind  of the information.  For instance, you might be told three items you need to buy in the store.  While trying to remember the words, you can imagine what those three items look like while sitting in your shopping cart.  In this way you both have verbal memories from when you heard the items told to you and visual memories from imagining yourself with those items in your cart.  Similarly, you can bolster your visual memory with your verbal memory.  For instance, you could try to remember where you parked your car at a store and at the same time you were visually looking at the parking spot, you could also verbally describe to yourself where you were parked.  In this example, you might look at the spot while telling yourself, “I am parked by the red pole, two spaces from the large concrete block.”  Your sight would provide the visual memory and the words would add  the verbal memory.  In these ways, both sides of your brain can be involved in helping you to remember information.  The more places you have information stored in your brain, the more easily you can later access that information.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

Frankie Muniz

We usually associate having a stroke as a medical condition of older age.  However, it is possible for a younger person to have a stroke.  Frankie Muniz, the 26 year-old actor best known for starring in the sitcom Malcolm in the Middle, suffered a stroke this past Friday.  The fact that his symptoms involved difficulties in language likely indicate that it was  a left-sided stroke, as language is generally controlled by the left side of the brain.  He appears to be doing better from the initial stroke and hopefully will see a full recovery.

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2012/12/04/frankie-muniz-suffers-mini-stroke/?intcmp=trending

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org