Monthly Archives: March 2014

A Brief Note on Wheelchair Etiquette

Due to the necessary and intimate often long-term dependence upon it, a brain injury survivor’s wheelchair should in all fairness be considered as having a special privacy attached to it. A wheelchair can often grow to be experienced as an extension of the survivor’s own body. Nearly every time a wheelchair is touched, the survivor using it will feel the contact as well. As a result, grabbing or touching a survivor’s wheelchair without permission can be a cause for significant distress. It is always a good idea to ask permission prior to touching, grabbing, pushing or engaging in  any such activity with a survivor’s wheelchair. This shows respect to the survivor and his or her personal boundaries.
Similarly, it is common for a survivor to keep some form of a bag on the back of a wheelchair in order to hold important items. Again, there should rightly be considered a great deal of privacy as attached to such a bag. Going though the bag without permission shows just as much disrespect as going through a lady’s purse without permission. For the same reason you don’t rifle through someone’s purse without permission, it is important to ask a survivor’s permission prior to attempting to access his or her bag. A simple request for permission will go a long way to ensuring a respectful and harmonious environment.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

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Free Brain Injury Webinar

On April 17th, the Brain Injury Association is offering a free webinar titled “Outsmarting Your Brain Injury and Getting Back to Work.”  The webinar is designed to give valuable insight on returning to work and managing Vocational Rehabilitation services.  Click on the link below to register:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2000123057968881665

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

Exciting Research

As one of the leaders in post-acute brain injury research, the Transitional Learning Center is always looking to push the current boundaries of treatment.  A new area of research in the field of brain injury relates to the use of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).  In a nutshell, rTMS involves using temporary, externally applied magnetism in order to change localized functioning of the brain so as to better improve recovery.  TLC Medical Director Dr. Brent Masel, Research Coordinator Jack Foreman and Physical Therapist Claudia Forshee recently presented a series of research posters at academic conferences which demonstrate both how rTMS helped a patient with a spinal cord injury recover hand function and how it improved mobility for a patient with a brain injury.  These are just a few of the examples of the rTMS research ongoing at TLC.  The research is presented below in its original conference posters format as powerpoint.  Though this may be a bit more technical than ideal for some readers of this blog, hopefully it will at least succeed in giving an overall idea of some of the groundbreaking research at TLC using this new treatment methodology.

rTMS Poster_final 

5Hz rTMS for iSCI Poster

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org