Tag Archives: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

What Happened to Your Shoes?

We each have a way that we are used to visualizing ourselves. It is part of our identity. We may comb our hair in a certain way, favor certain styles of clothing or wear certain shades of lipstick. Catching sight of ourselves in a mirror presenting in our typical manner helps reinforce a sense of normalcy. Any change to our usual look or style has potential to cause us some level of discomfort or stress.

After a brain injury, survivors may change their normal looks or styles. Sometimes, this is done for safety or practicality. For instance, certain pairs of sneakers may not supply adequate ankle support for safe ambulation or certain shirts are too hard to put on independently. However, in other cases survivors fall into habits of “dressing down” on a daily basis. Survivors may say to themselves, “I am not going to same places that I used to go, so I will just wear my ugly jogging pants. Who cares, right?” Or, survivors may say to themselves, “Why dress to impress? I have no one to impress. I will just put on a t-shirt and sweatpants every day instead of my favorite shirt and pants.”

This “dressing down” can cause a negative emotional feedback loop. Dressing differently serves as a constant reminder that survivors are not living the same lives as before. Survivors see themselves dressed poorly, which may make them feel badly. Feeling badly causes survivors to be even less inclined to dress nicely so they continue to dress poorly. In turn, seeing themselves dressed poorly on a daily basis may make survivors feel even worse than before. For some survivors, this contributes to a downward spiral in mood.

As “dressing down” makes many survivors feel badly, dressing as they would have prior to their injuries often makes survivors feel better. Even if survivors are not going to the same jobs or activities as before, putting on nicer clothes on a regular basis may help them feel emotionally better. For ladies this often includes putting on make-up or jewelry (as they would have prior to their injuries). The experience of seeing themselves fully “put together” will often improve survivors’ moods. For many people, even without injuries, if they “look like a million dollars” then they “feel like a million dollars.” And when moods are improved, other facets of their lives are often easier and better. So break out your nice wardrobes and feel better!

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

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Bubba Smith and CTE

The phrase “larger than life personality” could have been invented to describe Bubba Smith.  Looming at 6’7″ and almost 300 pounds, he was the first pick of the 1967 NFL draft and earned his ring at Superbowl V with the Baltimore Colts.  His extraordinary defensive skills on the football field left many a shell-shocked quarterback lying prostate in his wake.  Following his nine year professional football career, he parlayed his fame into a second career in film and television.  He is best known in the acting world as Captain Moses Hightower in the Police Academy movies and for his appearances in Miller Lite commercials.  After he passed in 2011, his estate allowed researchers to study his brain for evidence of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).  It was discovered that he had been living under the effects of level three CTE (the scale runs from one to four).  Follow the link below to read more about these findings.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/25/sports/football/bubba-smith-cte-nfl-concussion.html?_r=1

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: http://tlcrehab.org/

 

 

 

NFL Settlement Battle

Lawyers representing the vast majority of National Football League retirees seeking legal recourse due to the deleterious effect upon their lives resulting from brain injuries suffered throughout the course of their careers will be in court on Wednesday to argue over the terms of the settlements between the NFL and those former players.  This may be the final settlement between the NFL and the former players, though some players have opted out of the settlement in order to pursue individual lawsuits.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/11/17/us-nfl-concussions-idUSKCN0J123S20141117

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org

Tony Dorsett

Tony Dorsett was one of the greatest players in football history.  Over the years he began to experience memory loss, mood swings and thoughts of suicide.  He took the initiative to be tested for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), which is a brain damage experienced secondary to multiple traumas to the brain.  In Dorsett’s case, these traumas occurred as a result of the thousands upon thousands of hits he endured  over the course of his playing career.  Dorsett was found to have signs of CTE.  The link below will bring you to a video in which he discusses his experience learning to cope with the symptoms of brain injury. In addition to providing further detail on Dorsett’s story, the article beneath the video relates the similar experiences of Hall of Fame lineman Joe DeLamielleure and All Pro linebacker Leonard Marshall as they also have experienced brain injury symptoms and received the CTE diagnosis.

http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/9931754/former-nfl-stars-tony-dorsett-leonard-marshall-joe-delameilleure-show-indicators-cte-resulting-football-concussions

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center: tlcrehab.org